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Internet infrared system 'Li-Fi' is 100 times faster

20 March 2017, 04:32 | Taylor George

Internet infrared system 'Li-Fi' is 100 times faster

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Elaborating further, researchers revealed users wouldn't be required to share the signals since each device will be getting its own ray of the infrared beam. Other PhDs are still working on the technology that tracks the location of all the wireless devices as well as on the essential central fiber-optic network connecting the light antennas.

The researchers said that the network does not create any interference. The light antennas are equipped with a pair of gratings that refract light at different angles.

Whereas traditional Wi-Fi utilizes 2.5 or 5 gigahertz radio signals, Eindhoven's system relies on light wavelengths of 1500 nanometers or more, which has very high frequencies allowing for the larger capacity.

Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology have developed a system that is simple and low-cost to set up.

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Researchers out of Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands recently achieved Wi-Fi speeds of 42.8 Gbit/s on a network that uses infrared rays to transmit data.

Henceforth, we can say this system is cheap and easy to set-up.

In a test of the design, Eindhoven doctoral student Joanne Oh delivered 42Gbps in a ray of light over 2.5 meters, which is about 2,000 times faster than the average connection speed in Dutch homes today.

If you walk around as a user and your smartphone or tablet moves out of the light antenna's line of sight, then another light antenna takes over. While being the most advanced and novel aspect of Photonic technology, the system isn't going to be commercially available until at least next five years. He thinks that the first devices to be connected to this new kind of wireless network will be high data consumers like video monitors, laptops or tablets.

In a rare feat accomplished by Dutch researchers at the Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands, a new wireless internet based on harmless infrared rays, is all set to support devices without ever getting congested. But the problem is that such a concept requires control of mirrors which in turn needs energy.



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